Advisory

Please take note of the following before your visit.

Swimming season

Lifeguards will be on duty from 10 am to 6 pm (7 pm at Leamy Lake) from June 16 to September 4, 2023. Given the shortage of lifeguards, some beaches may be unsupervised at certain times. For your safety, stay in the swimming areas marked by buoys.

Dogs and pets are not permitted at the beaches.

School groups, day camps and other groups: plan your visit to the beach

Beaches status

During swimming season, beaches are tested every week for bacteriological water quality.

Beach
Status
Water Quality
Season over Not available
Season over Not available
Season over Not available
Season over Not available
Season over Not available
Season over Not available
Closed for the season Not available

Last update: September 10, 2023

Find out about the water quality at the NCC River House on the Swim Guide website.

Swimmer’s Itch

Swimmer’s itch is a skin rash caused by tiny larvae called cercariae, which are found in some lakes. Swimmer’s itch is not associated with polluted water.

Over the past few years, cases of swimmer’s itch have been reported at the beaches in Gatineau Park and elsewhere in Quebec.

To help prevent swimmer’s itch, follow the tips suggested in the brochure published by Quebec’s Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux.

To find out if cases of swimmer’s itch have been reported this summer, please contact the Gatineau Park Visitor Centre. However, please note that cercariae can still be present in Gatineau Park lakes without cases of swimmer’s itch having been reported.

Blue-green algae

Blue-green algae bloom on the surface of a lake.
Blue-green algae bloom on the surface of a lake.

Blue-green algae can be found in most natural water bodies. In small quantities, these microscopic bacteria present no risk. Under some conditions, such as in stagnant, warm or shallow water, they can proliferate, even in healthy lakes. And this is when they can pose a risk to public health.

Even though blue-green algae are always present, they generally cannot be seen with the naked eye. When they grow in large quantities, they form algae blooms, which are visible: they make the water’s surface appear blue-green, green or turquoise. Avoid all contact with the water if it appears green or cloudy.

Learn more about blue-green algae and how to identify it

If you see a blue-green algae bloom, report it to

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