Curfew and lockdown in Quebec

Gatineau Park day shelters are open on a first-come, first-served basis (for one household at a time), and are accessible at all times for emergencies.


Gatineau Park’s day shelters are rustic, cottage-type structures that provide a resting place for Park users. They are equipped with the basic amenities for users to take a break and warm up: wood stove and necessities for a fire (during winter only), picnic tables, clothing and equipment racks, and outhouses.

They are also equipped with a trail map and emergency communication system.

During your outing, stop in at one of the Park’s 11 shelters to warm up and have a snack. It will help you be fresh and ready for the last leg of your outing.

Capacity: 1 household at a time (first-come, first-served)

Important

  • Because of the reduced shelter capacity, we ask that you limit the amount of time you spend in the shelter, to allow other users a chance to take a break inside as well.
  • Follow COVID-19 public health guidelines.
  • Pets are not permitted in the day shelters, or on ski, snow bike and snowshoe trails.
  • Dispose of your trash and recyclable material in the receptacles provided for this purpose, or take your trash back home with you, where you can dispose of it properly.
  • It is prohibited to possess or consume alcohol.
  • Overnight stays are not permitted at day shelters.

Day shelters

Old Chelsea sector

Sugarbush Shelter (closed in 2020–2021)

❄️/☀️ Accessible on foot, by bike and by car year-round

The Sugarbush Shelter is located a few metres from the Visitor Centre in Old Chelsea. It is open from 9 am to 4 pm and does not have an emergency communication system. It is equipped with a waxing table for cross-country skis.

Location – Sugarbush Shelter

Parkway sector

Keogan Shelter

Keogan Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis only in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot, by bike and by car in summer.

The Keogan Shelter is located on Trail 1, near the Fortune Lake Parkway.

It was built in 1923 by the Cliffside Ski Club, to provide overnight shelter for club members.

Location – Keogan Shelter

Shilly Shally Shelter (closed in 2020–2021)

❄️ Accessible on skis only in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Shilly Shally Shelter is located on Trail 1, near the Fortune Lake Parkway. It is the smallest shelter in the Park. It does not have an emergency communication system.

The Shilly Shally Shelter was formerly the summer residence of photographer Rosemary Gilliat Eaton.

Location – Shilly Shally Shelter

Huron Shelter

Huron Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis only in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Huron Shelter is located on Trail 1, near the Huron and Étienne Brûlé lookouts.

Location – Huron Shelter

Western Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis only in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Western Shelter is located on Trail 1, near Champlain Lookout.

Location – Western Shelter

Luskville Falls sector

McKinstry Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis only in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The McKinstry Shelter is located on Trail 1.

Location – McKinstry Shelter

Meech Creek Valley

Healey Shelter

Healey Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis, snowshoes and by fat bike in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Healey Shelter is accessible via trails 50 (on skis) and 70 (on snowshoes and by fat bike).

Between 1820 and 1880, British, American and French-Canadian pioneers began to settle in the Gatineau Hills. Among them were Irish immigrants Edward and Bridget Healey, who established this 81-hectare (200-acre) homestead around 1863.

Location – Healey Shelter

Herridge Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis, snowshoes and by fat bike in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Herridge Shelter is accessible via trails 50 (on skis) and 70 (on snowshoes and by fat bike).

Its name comes from its last occupant, William Duncan Herridge, an Ottawa lawyer and son-in-law to Prime Minister R.B. Bennett.

Location – Herridge Shelter

Wakefield sector

Brown Lake Shelter

Brown Lake Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis, snowshoes and by fat bike in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Brown Lake Shelter is accessible via trails 57 (on skis) and 72 (on snowshoes and by fat bike). It is located near the historic village of Wakefield. This former cabin was recently converted to a day shelter and is powered by solar energy.

Location – Brown Lake Shelter

Philippe Lake sector

Renaud Shelter

Renaud Shelter

❄️ Accessible on skis and snowshoes in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot and by bike in summer.

The Renaud Shelter is accessible via trails 55 (on skis) and 74 (on snowshoes). Having undergone a complete makeover in 2014, the shelter now boasts a much more modern architecture than that of the other Park shelters.

It is named after the Renaud family who settled in the Philippe Lake area in the late 19th century.

Location – Renaud Shelter

Lusk Lake Cabin (closed in 2020–2021*)

❄️ Accessible on skis only in winter.
☀️ Accessible on foot only in summer.

The Lusk Lake Cabin is located on Trail 54.

The cabin is named after Joseph Lusk, an Irish pioneer who came to Canada in 1820 and became a prosperous farmer in the region.

* This cabin will not be used as a day shelter in 2020–2021. However, it is possible to reserve an overnight stay at the cabin.

Location – Lusk Lake Cabin

Outdoor rest areas

In winter, there are five outdoor rest areas with fire pits and benches where users can stop for a rest and take a break.

Philippe Lake sector: For snowshoers and snow bikers

  • Trail 71
  • Trail 73 (two locations)

New! Parkway sector: For skiers

  • Mica (intersection of the Gatineau and Champlain parkways)
  • Étienne Brûlé Lookout

Useful information

COVID-19 public health guidelines

  • Keep a 2-m distance from others.
  • Respect the posted maximum capacity.
  • Wear a face covering inside when not seated (mandatory).
  • Disinfect hands upon entry, and use cleaning products provided to disinfect table and benches.
  • Follow directional signage.
  • Limit time spent inside, out of consideration for other users.


For the best experience, bring the following with you:

  • Lunch, snacks, drinks
  • Matches to start a fire in the wood stove, if necessary
  • Candles or flashlight; shelters are not equipped with lighting or electricity
  • A bag for packing out your garbage